News

July

Harvesting the Grain, wheat and rye, was a bit of a challenge between rains. The green peas, grown for a processor, also got harvested and it looked like a good harvest. 3 sets of ducklings have hatched. One mother managed to hatch 17 !

June

This was the first year we had the coyote visit too close for comfort. Now we need to be on the look out and need to make sure all chickens are in at night.

May

April

March 

February

January 2017

December 2016

November

October

September

Aug

The dry weather continued till the middle of the month. There was hardly any second cut hay to harvest. For the grain harvest, spelt, wheat and mixed grain, the dry weather made work easy. But on the other hand we lost many small trees that we had planted the year before as shelter belt around the fence line of the farm. Despite taking water to them a few times. Luckily we had our potatoes in a field where we could irrigate. Harvest is a bit earlier but the yield looks good.

July

This year we again grew many acres of Green peas for a processor. Unfortunately the peas suffered under the drought and the fields were hardly worth harvesting. The pastures also start drying up and the cows need to be fed hay from winter storage.

June

This is the month to cut the hay fields and make round bales to feed our cows in the winter.

May

Potatoes are planted and mixed grain. Calves are born on both farms and the animals enjoy being out on pasture again.

April

The maple sap is running again after some warm spells. We love to drink it fresh from the tree. A good spring cleanser for the body. Some bottles of sap made it into the freezer for those requesting it later in the year.

March

This is the month for meetings, seminars, preparing forms and applications, yes and paying fees to the different organisations we belong to.

February

A warm February made it a bit more easy to do barn and other chores.

January 2016

Winter chores are divided between barn chores, feeding, bedding, cleaning as well as machinery repair and sorting potatoes.

December 2015

Sometimes people ask what do you do in the winter? Well, on the farm the winter month chores take longer, chickens and cattle eat a lot more to keep warm and waterlines and water bowls need to be kept from freezing. More straw and sawdust is needed for bedding and tractors need to be plugged in and preheated to get them started before moving bales of hay and straw around. Three fires are kept going and firewood from our bush lot has to make it’s way into the heated workshop to keep the potatoes from freezing and for the house for cooking and heating.

November

It’s still busy as Fritz and his sons take every spare hour to put drainage tiles into the fields to reduce wet-spots.This involves a lo of  hard work in heavy clay covered boots, often wet from above. The chickens have been moved inside where it is warmer and dry.

October

The cows have now the alfalfa fields to roam and happily graze the third growth. They started to grow their winter coats already and look like woolly bears. It was very busy on the farm and again we didn’t manage to book enough animals to fill the freezers in order to meet the growing demand. But for November and December it looks better.

September

A very busy month with potato harvest, winter grains are planted as well as cover crops. Cattle graze on the whole range and calves are getting curious like teenagers. Not always respecting their boundaries.

August

Grain harvest! Rye, soft wheat, spelt and a lot of mixed grain got harvested in-between rains and in sometimes very hot weather. Straw then baled and stacked for bedding in the winter for the cattle.

July

Hurray the first potatoes are ready and available for sale.

June

Making good hay was a challenge. It takes at least 4 days sun shine in a row.

May

Calves are born and everyone is happy to be able to go out in fresh, lush pastures.

April

The maple sap is running and we love to drink it fresh from the tree. A good spring cleanser for the body. Some bottles of sap made it into the freezer for those requesting it later in the year.

March

A long wait for spring and no green grass in sight, but under the cover of snow the soil is resting well and will be alive  soon again and when the time comes, everything needs to be ready: The seeds, the equipment, the tools and the tractors.

February 2015

Keeping warm, the fires going and the barn from freezing has become a full time job. Fritz hurt his arm and Linda cracked a rip, thankfully we had visitors helping out with barn chores.

January 2015

Again it looks like we are in for a real Canadian winter. The tractor with the snow blower on front has made many trips in and out the lane. And it was soooo cold.

December 2014

Sometimes people ask what do you do in the winter? Well, on the farm the winter month chores take longer, chickens and cattle eat a lot more to keep warm and waterlines and water bowls need to be kept from freezing. More straw and sawdust is needed for bedding and tractors need to be plugged in and preheated to get them started before moving bales of hay and straw around. Three fires are kept going and firewood from our bush lot has to make it’s way into the heated workshop to keep the potatoes from freezing and for the house for cooking and heating.

November

It’s still busy as Fritz and his sons take every spare hour to put drainage tiles into the fields to reduce wet-spots.This involves a lo of  hard work in heavy clay covered boots, often wet from above. The chickens have been moved inside where it is warmer and dry.

October

The cows have now the alfalfa fields to roam and happily graze the third growth. They started to grow their winter coats already and look like woolly bears. It was very busy on the farm and again we didn’t manage to book enough animals to fill the freezers in order to meet the growing demand. But for November and December it looks better.

September

What a potato harvest! We had good help and the harvest was so plenty full we run out of potato  crates. Also the Yukon Gold variety outdid itself again and some grew too large, which means hollow hearts. A new variety Vivaldi, turned out to be a real charm, good size, nice skin, very good taste. This yellow fleshed potato is becoming popular quickly around here. Other varieties are, Red, Russet, and a white potato.

August

The rain this summer was a blessing most of the time. But the windows to make hay where very short and it was a challenge to cut the grass, turn it, rake and bale and bring it home before it rained again. The pastures on the other hand stayed green all summer and the cows and calves had good munching grass all summer long. The first potatoes were dug by hand and it looked like we can expect a good harvest.

July

A bussy time as we started to renovate the store area and the hay harvest is in full swing at the same time. Animals need to be looked after and freezers are getting restocked. a good time to think purchasing bulk. Beef or chickens.

June

Finally summer. The cows are out on pasture with their little calves. The first hay is cut and stored away, The first ducklings hatched and there are kittens too.

May

A lot got accomplished in May thanks to our wwoofer Mirjam. Also the fields got all planted, grains, peas and of course potatoes. The first calves are born and eager to explore the barn and pasture.

April

Will this winter ever end? We can’t wait for things to get dry and warm.

March

A long wait for spring and no green grass in sight, but under the cover of snow the soil is resting well and will be alive  soon again and when the time comes, everything needs to be ready: The seeds, the equipment, the tools and the tractors.

February 2014

Freezers are getting empty, but by the 7th we will be restocked again with beef. Planning for the upcoming season is underway, let us know what we can grow for you. In the meantime you can also support us by supporting the National farmers Union in our effort to save our seeds. Get informed and take action visit www.nfu.ca/issues/save-our-seed

The rights of farmers and other Canadians to save, reuse, exchange, and sell seeds are under attack again.

On November 13, 2013, Canada’s Agriculture Minister, Gerry Ritz, announced that Canada plans to sign on to UPOV ’91 by August 1 2014. On December 9, 2013 he introduced an omnibus agriculture bill in Parliament, called the “Agricultural Growth Act” which contains the required amendments to the Plant Breeders Rights Act to conform with UPOV ’91 among other measures. This will enhances the rights of multinational seed companies such as Monsanto, Syngenta, Bayer, Dow, Viterra, Pioneer, DuPont and Cargill, while restricting farmers’ rights.

January

It looks we are in for a real Canadian winter. The tractor with the snow blower on front has made many trips in and out the lane. The chickens are not laying us much eggs and the young ones haven’t started yet. Fritz is giving his antique LANZ tractor an over haul in the workshop in his spare time between barn chores, snow blowing, fire wood, hay deliveries and other duties.

December

Well and then came winter.  On the farm this means chores take longer, chickens and cattle eat a lot more to keep warm and waterlines and water bowls need to be kept from freezing. More straw and sawdust is needed for bedding and tractors need to be plugged in and preheated to get them started before moving bales of hay and straw around. Three fires are kept going and firewood from our bush lot has to make it’s way into the heated workshop to keep the potatoes from freezing and for the house for cooking and heating.

November

It’s a bit more quiet around the farm. The chicken like it better in the warm barn, the cats like to cuddle up in the straw, even the horses come in when the weather is wet and the fields are muddy. Lots of ducks and chickens in the freezers but beef sells out quickly. Call before you come out. By the middle of December we should have all cuts available again and we are taking orders for sides and quarters for January.

October

The last Potatoes are finally harvested and what a harvest it was! Beautiful potatoes, good size and no dust clouds during harvest and very few weeds to get in the way. Thanks to all our helpers who gave us an extra hand when needed, all spuds are stored away. The rain and warm weather kept the grass and alfalfa in the hay fields growing. Since we can not dry hay anymore with the short days, we fenced in the fields and now our cows enjoy munching away in the big fields.

September

The Potato harvest started out very promising so far. As always we had to play with the weather and  drying hay  was rather tricky. For the Doors Open event we had many people come out despite rain all day. Thanks for visiting us.

August

The Potato crop is looking very good this year and so are our calves. The rye and wheat has been harvested just before the big rain. Now we are getting ready for potatofest and would like to invite everyone to join on the last Sunday in August for a afternoon on the farm. For more details see:

Potatofest13 flyer

July

This month we explore the idea of establishing a delivery service in the KW area. If interested let us know so we can plan things out and keep in contact.

Taste Local Taste fresh event is coming up in September at Steckkles and Laepples are participating. Get your tickets and enjoy what local farmers have to offer and local chefs prepare. Details on the link below.

TLTF 2013 postcard

June

June came and went in a hurry and with it lots of rain. making the grass grow but little opportunity to make hay. The garden at the back lane, managed as 7th lane farm by Michelle and Sidney looks promising and the first greens have been harvested, very tasty. The chickens have been moved outside and do well.

May

May was a very exiting month for the Laepple family as we all traveled to Germany for the wedding of our second oldest daughter. We left the farm in good hands who looked after the animals and the store while we where gone. many calves were born in April and May and the first ducklings hatched, 17 in one nest and another 17 in the other. Soon they will be roaming the farm and taking care of flies and bugs.

Join us on April 9: Take Action to Stop GM Alfalfa

Tuesday April 9, 2013
12 noon (sharp) to 1 pm

This call for a Day of Action to Stop GM Alfalfa was issued by the National Farmers Union-Ontario.
For info on the Day of Action: www.cban.ca/april9
For more information on GM Alfalfa: www.cban.ca/alfalfa

Kitchener-Waterloo: Constituency Office of Peter Braid. 22 King St. South, Waterloo. Contact: Taarini Chopra campaigns@cban.ca

 Why is GM Alfalfa Such a Huge Threat? 

GM contamination is inevitable because alfalfa is a perennial crop pollinated by insects. In Ontario and Alberta, weeds are becoming resistant to glyphosate (the active ingredient in Monsanto’s herbicide Roundup): another glyphosate tolerant crop like Roundup Ready alfalfa would increase these weeds as well as rise glyphosate found in drinking water and peoples blood, incl. children and the unborn. Alfalfa is almost always grown in a mix with grasses and establishes readily without the use of herbicides. Farmers don’t want or need Roundup Ready alfalfa. If genetically modified (GM, also called genetically engineered or GE) alfalfa is released it will have negative impacts on a wide range of farmers and farming systems, both conventional and organic, across Canada. For more information see www.cban.ca/alfalfa

March

 The Waterloo-Wellington Local of the National Farmers Union invites everyone to their Awards Night and Farmer’s Dinner at our AGM on Thursday March 28, 2013 at the Legion in Arthur. Come celebrate with us the past, the present and the future of farming as we present the Sustainable farming, Future farming and Barn preservation awards to local farmers.

Doors open at 6:00. Dinner at 7pm. Guest speaker Paul Kozak, Ontario Apiarist, will share the latest research on bees. Dinner tickets are only $20 and are available now. Chef Chris Jess with his students from the Elora food school www.foodschool.ca   will again prepare a local dinner. For more information, car pooling, to reserve your tickets or to sponsor tickets for our outstanding winners or nominees, ask Linda at your next visit to the farm or contact wwnfuo@gmail.com

February

The quiet time Linda uses for research on sustainable energy and carbon footprint of our farm operation. Our 10 kw solar system on the old barn roof produces about 90% of our electricity needs. Our investment in renewable energy on our farm and as a member in LIFE (Local Initiative for future  Energy Coop see links) plays a major role in our retirement strategy. We let the sun shine on our investment and invite everyone to also become a LIFE member’

January 2013 Happy New Year everyone !

What does a farmer do in the winter you might wonder ? At the Laepple farm the everyday barn chores, feeding cows, chickens, pigs, horse and pony and other little four legged friends keep us busy in the morning and late afternoon. In the work shed, Fritz just restored a old Massey Ferguson Tractor. Now it runs and looks like new again. When it’s not too cold Fritz (and his boys and girls when home) cut firewood in the bush beside the highway. Lot’s of dead standing trees to choose from. Slowly the bush is recovering from being recklessly harvested before we bought the farm. Linda keeps herself busy with meetings, new projects and of course the farm store.

December 2012

A good selection of cattle have gone to the butcher making it a bit easier with this years much smaller hay storage to feed them thru the winter. Another great blessing was the fact that for the first 2 weeks in December the cattle still could go out in the field and graze. It almost looks like Nature wants to make up for this summers drought.

November

An amazing field of Daikon radishes hidden in lush mixed grain appeared as a second crop where we had planted peas for a contractor earlier in the summer. What was meant to improve to soil turned out to be an extra harvest. We filled a number of bins for winter storage.

October

The dry summer is showing it’s affect across the food system. We are lucky in that we do not need to reduce our cattle but the waiting list at the butcher is long and therefore we sell out frequently of some products before we can take in another animal. The ducks have done very well this summer and there will be fresh ducks available on October the 16th and November 15.

September

Lack of rain this summer, the harvest is much smaller and we feel nothing should go to waste. Therefore we would like to invite field gleaners to come and pick what the potato harvester left in the field. Any age welcome. Call to arrange a time.

Potatofest August 26 was great fun

Again we hosted our open house to kick-start into this years potato harvest season. A big thank you to all who helped to make this one of the best ever. Also thank you for all the compliments. Lack of rain this summer the harvest is much smaller and we would like to invite field gleaners to come and pick what the potato harvester left in the field. We ask to help us so nothing goes to waste. Any age welcome.

August

Hurray for the rain!!! The pastures are turning green again and the vegetables don’t need watering. This year we are sharing again our land with a few vegetable growers. Whatever is in season will be available at the store in small amounts and more by preordering . Contact Michelle or Sydney  7thlinefarm@gmail.com 519-725-5499 7th Line Farm Wholesale Order Form Aug 9-1

July

 

The rain didn’t come. The grass could not grow as in other years and our harvest of hay is only half what it should have been. The second cut of hay looks even worse. We started to let the cattle graze some of the hayfields as it’s not worth a second cutting. There will be next to no hay for sale to our horse customers and we hope it will be enough for our own use as we already had to start feed hay to supplement the dry pastures.

The wheat harvest produced smaller than normal kernels and bone dry. With the rye we were very lucky. It was one of the hottest days when Fritz harvested. A storm was rolling in and just as Freddy raced home with the 2 wagon loads and into the shed, long awaited rain started to pour down. Had it rained on the rye in the field the whole harvest would have been lost as rye germinates right away once it’s ripe and gets moisture again.

Despite all the challenges there is always a good side.

June

The demand for grass fed beef is growing steady and there are times when we run short on some cuts. It is good to give us a call or send an email if you are looking for a certain cut or larger quantity of beef. The good news is we have lot’s of calves born this spring so in 2 years time we should be able to level things out again, all depending if the rain keeps coming in time to grow enough grass. In may it sure didn’t look like it. Time will tell.

May

A happy team of students and wwoofers joined us for the next weeks to help out with chores in the barn and in the fields.

February

The mild winter allowed Fritz and his sons to work in the bush to cut firewood. There are a lot of dead standing trees to cut and remove to allow good straight trees to grow and mature. Anyone interested in firewood and exercise in fresh air is welcome to help for an afternoon when the weather allows.

 

January 2012

Welcome to the new year. In the store you can find organic apples from Loft grower Mary of apple creek farm. You can also order by the bushel by calling 519 638 9996.

The young chickens you used to see running outside in the summer and on warm days without snow even at this time of the year, are doing well and we have a blessing of eggs (which I am as a small producer are not allowed to advertise due to board regulations )

 

 

December

What does a farmer do in the winter? Well, the animals are in the barns and need hay to eat every day and straw to sleep on. Our young chickens started to lay eggs too, so collecting eggs and feeding chickens is another daily task. The mild weather allowed for plowing of fields and cleaning out barns and spreading compost and manure. Firewood for house and machinery shed needs to be cut and put in a dry place for next year. As always there are machines to be repaired and buildings fixed.

The pigs went to the butcher and lots of sausage and bacon is in the freezer. Beef roasts and steaks are again sold out but there is a fresh lot of ground beef. After Christmas all cuts are available again.

The winter months are also full of meetings and networking events around farming and local food issues. See the links page.

November

Apple cider fresh pressed as well as frozen is available again this year. We use apples from a heritage orchard, the trees and apples are not sprayed whatsoever. This year the apples are very sweet and so is the cider.

Fresh or frozen 1.3 litre bags are available for $2.5 each

October

This is still a very busy month on the farm and the rain makes some work challenging. On a different note we like to ask everyone to get involved in whatever way they can to educate themselves about ongoing issues that affect your dinner table and the water you drink. look at the links page to find out.

One special event connected with landgrabbing and corporate rights versus community in the example of Shelburns area proposed mega quarry.

Native leader and artist Del Ashkewe has invited members of our local National Farmers Union and the general public to a workshop about Protecting our rights to water on Saturday Nov 5th 2011 from 10am to 4pm in Honeywood at the old Schoolhouse. For more info call 519 848 2084 or email protect_water_rights@hotmail.com The proposed quarry has plans to dig twice as deep as Niagara Falls affecting all major rivers in Ontario and your groundwater too.

 

September

Potato harvest is slow this year since our son is away in college. Also the volume is much less then other years. Still volunteers and field cleaners wanted, pick all you need for your family!

August 2011
Our 10th annual Potatofest was great. Pictures coming soon.
Potatofest is a farm tour and open house, or better, open farm and you are invited too: Potatofest Invite,
There is lots to see and do Potatofest11 flyer
You can come for part of the afternoon or all day Potatofest 11schedule,
Thanks for visiting!
July 2011
This year we grow and carry a selection of vegetables as they come available throughout the season. Ask whats available.
June 2011:
Every Thursday after 3pm you can pick up a fresh produce box with 10 to 12 different vegetables, fruits or berries as they come in season. Everything is grown by Waterloo Wellington area family farmers who are members of the Local Organic Food Team Cooperative. There are 3 box sizes available.
For more details call Debby Loepp at 519 656 3356
or visit www.localorganicfoodteam.blogspot.com
email   localorganicfoodteam@gmail.com